tamorapierce

Necromancy, Shmecromancy

tamorapierce:

almostalanna:

It occurs to me Tortall has absolutely no qualms against necromancy at all. Neither Daine nor Thom get any backlash against their ‘raising dead things’ life choices, and even Blayce is frowned upon for the whole murdering children aspect, not the ‘using undead souls to fuel his death machines’. 

Well, and the death machines, but not the whole undead bit. That part’s ok. 

Well, it’s wrong to wake dead people up, and to imprison them, but there’s a very simply answer to why the whole necromancy thing isn’t popular.

Haven’t you noticed that no one gets to do it for very long, or very successfully? 

Roger and Thom tinker with it for, what, 2-3 years?  They die.  Blayce, ditto.  Daine was gifted with it under a limited-term contract by a goddess with a grudge to pay off.

It takes a lot of power to raise anyone from the dead, and those who do don’t get to do it for very long.  The mechanism of the Black God taking back what is his may be as subtle as a lady knight coming into her own, but no one survives very long usurping the god’s power.

Hubris.  The only way to win … is not to play.

<3 these worlds

After gushing about it to my friends all week, I realized I should link The Turn of The Story, a novel-length fantasy story Sarah Rees Brennan has been posting online in parts. I’ve been enthusiastically recommending her works, especially the Lynburn Legacy series, to anyone interested in the genre for a while, but this one has really gone above and beyond in addressing issues like sexism and the perpetuation of violence while being chock-full of Sarah Rees Brennan’s usual wit and sarcasm. I’m dying for the next part. (Mark has also read most of this series)

marazione

birdwithapeopleface:

ianbrooks:

World of the Ring by Jian Guo

Middle-Earth seems like it’s a pretty happening place: plenty of exotic locales to explore, elves handing out gifts, trees to ride when your footses ache, and treasure available only to those courageous enough to take it. If it ever existed in a Tolkien novel or note, then Jian has probably drawn it: his jaw-droppingly resplendent masterpieces tell just as enthralling a story as the novels they emulate… though in considerably fewer words. The lead image: “A Long Adventure with a Hobbit” is available in print form at Jian’s DeviantArt.

Artist: Blog (via: Kotaku)

These are astounding!!!